BU Law Professor Weighs in on Tsarnaev Verdict


AUDIO: BU Law professor Karen Loor shares thoughts about the jury’s decision and what to expect in the death penalty phase of the trial.

CNN-  The bombs Dzhokhar Tsarnaev planted with his brother at the Boston Marathon killed three people, wounded more than 250 and left a scarred city searching for answers.

On Wednesday, nearly two years later, a jury weighed in with a decisive verdict, finding Tsarnaev guilty of all 30 counts that he faced in the deadly bombings and their aftermath.

The highly anticipated decision came after 11½ hours of deliberations.

Tsarnaev, 21, stood with his head bowed and his hands clasped as the verdict was read.

Victims and their families looked on, some of them on the edge of their seats.

“Obviously we are grateful for the outcome today,” bombing survivor Karen Brassard said after the verdict was announced. “It’s not a happy occasion, but it’s something that we can put one more step behind us.”

Jeff Bauman, who lost his legs in the bombing, said he was relieved.

“Nothing can ever replace the lives that were lost or changed forever,” Bauman said in a statement, “but at least there is some relief in knowing that justice is served and responsibility will be taken.”

Jurors found that Tsarnaev was responsible for killing the three people who died from the marathon bombings — Krystle Campbell, Lingzi Lu and Martin Richard. He was also responsible for the shooting death of MIT police officer Sean Collier three days after the marathon blasts, the jurors said.

Seventeen of Tsarnaev’s convictions are capital charges, meaning he’s eligible for the death penalty.

The trial will next move into a penalty phase, where the jury will hear testimony and arguments from both sides and ultimately be tasked with deciding whether he gets the death penalty or life in prison.

A date for that phase of the trial has not yet been set.

Boston. April 8, 2015. People opposing the death sentence in the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial stand outside the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse as the jury deliberated on the fate of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev during trial on Tuesday afternoon. The 12-person federal jury found Tsarnaev giulty of all 30 charges for his role in the bombing which killed thre and injured more than 250 people in 2013. The sentencing phase, during which Tsarnaev will either face life imprisonment or receive death penalty,  could start as early s next week, experts say.(Photo by: Haiyun Jiang/BU News Service)
Boston. April 8, 2015. People opposing the death sentence in the Dzhokhar Tsarnaev trial stand outside the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse as the jury deliberated on the fate of Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (Haiyun Jiang/BU News Service)

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